Wine for Normal People (wine)

One of the rising stars of Napa Valley, Jennifer Williams is winemaker for Arrow&Branch in Coombsville, a cooler Napa AVA, as well as for her own brand, Zeitgeist, which she runs with her husband (also a winemaker).

Jennifer shares her story of working with and learning from legendary winemakers such as Rosemary Cakebread and Francoise Peschon and time working at cult wineries Araujo and Spottswoode, where she was head winemaker.

We talk about Napa's future, Cabernet, the importance of vineyard in Napa, and how Jennifer balances her busy life. 

 

Special thanks to this week's sponsor: The Great Courses Plus! Visit

www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine to learn more! 

Direct download: 183_Ep_183__Jennifer_Williams_Star_Napa_Winemaker_of_ArrowBranch.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 9:44pm EDT

The first in a series for Women's History Month, I speak to Laura Catena of Bodegas Catena Zapata in Mendoza, Argentina. We discuss her life as a doctor, a mom, and the head of a wine empire, the history of Malbec and how her family aided the meteoric rise of Argentine wine and of the comeback of the Malbec grape around the world. 

A fun, sharp-as-a-tack woman, you'll learn a ton about Malbec, Mendoza, and a few life lessons from this fascinating podcast! 

 

Laura’s History and Background on the Catena Family

  • Her life as a doctor and the bridge between medicine and wine
  • Her career pivot to the wine and becoming “the wine doctor” for her country and family
  • Historical perspective
    • The Catena family history in wine
    • The history with Malbec and history of Catena and Malbec
  • Her dad and her homage to him: his pride of country and why he has been so successful

 

Malbec and it’s Rich History

  • Malbec Studies
    • Pre-phylloxera clippings
    • Flavors based on altitude/studies on altitude
    • The sides of Malbec: the agebility factor, and the evolution of the grape
    • Old v New vines: the real differences
      • Luca: Laura’s own project of all old vine wine, managed separately and small and how it fosters Argentinean pride

 

Laura’s Advice on Doing it All

  • How she handles being a mom, a doctor, and running a major wine company
    • The power of the B+
    • The balance of kids and work and life advice on spouses, marriage, and kids

 

Making Wine in Mendoza

  • High altitude growing and Catena’s role: Argentina has distinctive regions – b/c of the altitude huge variations in climates, move faster from warmer to colder
  • Nicolas’s (her dad’s) altitude bet and its payoff – combination, altitude, latitude, plant material
  • Sub-regions:
    • Lujan de Cuyo= old vines, clay soils, makes some good stuff
    • Uco Valley = Key region for quality
      • Sub-regions: Tupungato, Alta Mira, La Consulta, Gualtallary

 

The Wine Culture of Argentina and the Wines of Catena

  • Alamos: Gallo family’s distribution and the benefits of the relationship for the Catenas. The importance of keeping the small producers alive. The paradox of being big and supporting small producers
  • Lafite-Rothschild and Catena: Bodegas CARO wines
  • Luca: Laura’s project
  • Bodega Catena Zapata
    • Catena – classic Malbec, $20
    • Catena Alta – historic rows of vines
    • Catena Zapata/Adrianna Vineyards – small parcels, harvest plant by plant, hand harvested
Direct download: Ep_181__Laura_Catena_The_Leading_Lady_of_Argentine_Wine.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 12:44am EDT

Red Wine Headaches: Ideas On Causes and Remedies (but sadly not real solutions…)

Nearly every time I do a speaking event, a familiar scenario transpires. After the wine class, a person who seemed very interested in what I had to say approaches me with a sad look on his or her face and says, “I love the taste of wine. I’m so fascinated by the subject but I just can’t drink that often. I get a horrible headache every time I drink, especially with red wine. Is there anything I can do?”

 

My heart always breaks a little for that person and I hope that despite my obvious lack of expertise in health matters (here’s my caveat, I’m an MBA, not an MD so I am only offering this article second hand) that I can solve the problem and get the person back on track to enjoy wine, headache-free.

 

Before I go down this path, I want to be really clear about the information that’s widely available and that’s repeated over and over again in major wine outlets and news publications. I scoured scientific journals and I found an even better source – a scientist who scoured scientific journals[1] – to see what conclusive evidence there is on this topic. What I and they found was a lot of half studies without a statistically significant result in most cases. The bottom line is that no one has funded a large-scale study on this topic. (And I get it: really, who is going to fund something like this, which is what it comes down to? Wine companies have other priorities and they would be the most likely cash source…).  So as I share this info, I want to tell you now that except for two of these solutions, one which I can vouch for and another which has scientific proof behind it, the rest is pure conjecture.

 

Still, we’re not operating in the dark. There are some strong contenders for what is causing that nasty pounding after drinking wine or more specifically, red wine. And, better yet, if you’re not averse to taking an over-the-counter medicine, you could solve the problem fairly easily in many cases.

 

Let’s run through the different potential causes and give ideas on how to tackle them.

 

The first thing that is killing most heads…

I’m not going to hold you in suspense. I want to tell you the number one thing that is probably causing your headache: alcohol. It dehydrates the body, or to quote the UK National Health Service:

 

“Dehydration can also occur as a result of drinking too much alcohol. Alcohol is a diuretic, which means it makes you wee more.” (insert immature chuckle here).

 

And what a lot of us fail to realize is that most wine is somewhere between 12.5% and 14.5% alcohol by volume. That means that for a 5 ounce glass of wine, 12.5% to 14.5%, more or less, is made up of alcohol. Contrast that with beer, which is more like 3-4% alcohol by volume and you see that wine is not as innocuous as it seems.

 

So if you happen to have one or two glasses of wine, especially red, which tends to be higher in alcohol (because the grapes are riper and picked later, thus upping the sugar), AND you have no water in between and no food or nibbles, you are robbing your body of water. Dehydration gives you a headache, so there you go!  

 

The Solution?

First, try wines with lower alcohol content. If you can drink around 10% or 11% ABV versus 14%, that could help. Look on the bottle for the percentage – it’s required by law in most countries. Lower alcohol means more bang for your buck – 1 glass of this stuff won’t wallop you like one glass of a 14%’er will.

 

Alternately you can take a page out of the professional drinkers’ book people in the wine industry’s book. We’re usually downing water in between glasses or eating food to mitigate the effect of the high alcohol. It seems like our tolerances are off the charts (and they probably are to some extent) but a lot of that comes from experience and lots and lots of water.

 

Ok, that’s the number one cause of headaches. But there are several others, so don’t think I’m about to dismiss you if you’ve tried to drink water and it doesn’t work!

 

Next are the mean amines. Wines that go through malolactic fermentation release amines in the process, and have levels that can be 200% higher than in wines that don’t go through malo. There’s been some research done on the effect of the “amines” but nothing super conclusive. [2]

 

The second thing we’re pretty sure is causing pain: Histamines[3]

Histamines are compounds that exist in wine at varying levels. Red wine and bubbly tend to be higher in these pesky enzymes. That means if you have a sensitivity, you may have a terrible allergic reaction, e.g., a headache, rash, even sneezing. This is especially true for people with a diamine oxidase deficiency (you can take a probiotic to help that problem, incidentally). The National Institute of Health in the US has shown that high levels of histamine in blood plasma can create bad allergic reactions, including allergy headaches. Since alcohol increases histamine in blood plasma, you could wind up suffering with a headache.

 

The Solution?

Pop the anti-histamine of your choice about an hour before you drink wine. Still drink the water to prevent dehydration, but see if this helps you out. Again, no conclusive studies on this one, but it has some research behind it, so I’d give it a try (just check the interactions with alcohol before you take anything).

 

And the less proven amine…

Some doctors posit that high levels of the amino acid tyramine, which can cause migraines, is the main cause of headache pain from wines. If stuff like processed meats (think pepperoni or hot dogs), tofu, soy sauce, miso, and cheeses like blue, brie, cheddar, Swiss, or Roquefort give you a headache, you may have an issue with tyramine. Although the levels are lower in red wine than in these foods, they go hand in hand. You’ll need to skip the wine and cheese pairings and stick to one small glass of wine if you think this may be your issue. That said, apart from a few doctors saying they think this is the problem, I couldn’t find any studies to back it up.

 

Tannins often take heat for causing headaches. And they do change serotonin levels, which can cause migraines. They ARE more prominent in reds than in whites, so that could explain the issue for people who have problems with red and not white. Tannins also can release fatty acids (prostaglandins) that can cause headaches and pain.

 

But again, this is all conjecture. We don’t have much to back this up. Still, it’s a theory posited by headache specialists, so if you think this is your problem, take some kind of headache medicine – ibuprofen, Tylenol, aspirin, whatever. Again, watch out for the interaction between the wine and the drug.

 

 

What is probably NOT causing your headache? Sulfites

Sulfites/sulfur dioxide/sulphites are a naturally occurring byproduct of fermentation and are added to wine to prevent spoilage and browning. They are also in dried fruit jam, molasses, bottled lime and lemon juice, sauerkraut, lunchmeat, and gravy. Although wine is singled out as a product that has sulfites, plenty of others have equal or higher levels.

 

Unless you are part of the 1-5% of the population that has a sulfite allergy, this isn’t your problem. If you have severe asthma or allergies, this could be a huge issue and you’ll know it’s a problem because the result is not a headache, but an asthma attack or something worse. If you don’t have these issues, dismiss this one.  It’s better you move on and try to find the real cause.

 

The Wrap

After all this, I will repeat what I said at the beginning: the issue with a red wine headache or any wine headache is most likely dehydration or histamine issues or a combo of a few of these things. Try a few solutions and see if they work. And make sure you chug water. If it’s still an epic fail, I guess you’ll have to wait until I report back with some new, exciting finding that solves this really annoying problem!

 

[1] http://www.wineinformationcouncil.eu/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=1835:can-wine-trigger-migraine-attacks?&Itemid=640

[2] http://www.yalescientific.org/2009/10/everyday-qa-what-causes-the-red-wine-headache/

[3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8005453

Direct download: Audio_blog_14__Red_Wine_Headaches.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 9:42pm EDT

Stellenbosch is the most prestigious, oldest wine growing region in South Africa. It's beautiful, diverse, and a bridge between Old World and New World styles. We talk about the details of the region and why it's much more obscure than it should be. 

 

 

South African Wine Map

Direct download: Ep_180__Stellenbosch_South_Africa.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 12:41pm EDT

 

Slovenia is small but it's up and coming! It's a fascinating place with a long winemaking tradition that should pique your interest.

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Before you read on, a great thanks to our sponsor: The Great Courses Plus!

The Great Courses Plus has over 8,000 lectures on a ton of subjects, taught by experts. Well done and escapism that's addictive! You'll lear so much! 

Go to www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/wine to get a free trial (the special URL lets them know you heard about it here!). As I mentioned, The Everyday Gourmet: Rediscovering the Lost Art of Cooking is mandatory for you wine education!!! Watch and get back to me!!

_____________________________________________________________

Slovenia's Wine Stats:

  • Population of two million people, who drink a LOT: 5th highest wine consumption per capita in the world
  • About 75% of the country's production is white wine
  • 55K Planted acres makes it the size of Sonoma County, in California
  • Small portion of the wine is exported
  • 70% of the wine is premium, most is made in the clean modern style 
    • Some using ancient techniques (clay amphorae) to give the texture a tannic rasp and the wine a rosy, sometimes amber, hue (orange wines)

Slovenia's Wine History

  • Of Celts, Romans, Christians, and Napoleon
  • By the end of the WWII, co-ops controlled nearly all of the region's wine production: Sucky bulk wine production with a few small private wineries in the Drava Valley region
  • In 1967, the government established the PSVVS (Business Association for Viticulture and Wine Production)
  • In 1991, Slovenia was the first to declare independence from Yugoslavia
  • Dictatorship/Socialism/Communism separated countries from centuries of winemaking traditions but they are catching up now

Geography 

  • At crossroad of eastern and central Europe bordered by Hungary, Italy, Croatia, and Austria 
  • Important Rivers: Drava and Sava connect to the Danube
  • Dynamic regions on borders

3 Main Regions

  • Primorska: 
    • Near Italian region of Fruili Venezia Giulia, high quality whites and reds
    • Sub regions: Vipava Valley, Goriska Brda (gore-ISH-KA BURR-DA), Koper (pr. Coper), Karst plateau district
    • Grapes: Ribolla Gialla, Pinot Grigio, other whites, Refosco other reds
    • Experimentation and blending of old and new: Orange wines, clay amphora, and long, long aging
  • Drava (Podravje) 
    • Botrytis affected whites, Welschriesling, Furmin
    • Nearly 97% of the wine made in the Drava Valley region is white wine
    • Seven sub-regions
  • Lower Sava (Posavje) 
    • Only Slovenian wine region that produces more red wine than white, though not by a large margin
    • Three districts, you may see Lower Carniola on a bottle
    • Lower Sava Valley region is dominated by bulk wine, rather than premium wine, production
    • Use of many native grapes

Hope you enjoy this off-the-beaten trail podcast. 

 

Direct download: Ep_178__Slovenia.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 6:53am EDT

Simone Madden-Grey, our Down Under co-host, talks about the flavors of Shiraz & how it can't be pigeon-holed into one profile or type of wine. A refreshing look at Australia from an inside view, you'll want to run out to producers she mentions!

Direct download: 176_Ep_176__Australian_Shiraz_with_Simone_Madden-Grey.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 2:59pm EDT

Pfalz is the region for you if you have the question: How do I get into German wine If I hate sweet stuff?

Overview:

  • Pfalz is an important region in terms of quantity and quality. It's one of the most promising German wine regions for Riesling and Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir)
  • In Western Germany, Between Rhine and lower lying Haardt mountains – continuation of Vosges, just south is Alsace
    • Warmer climate
      • Summers are dry, not too hot, winters mild. almost Mediterranean in some sections (almonds grow here)
      • Excellent viticultural conditions

History:

  • Pfalz is from the Latin for for palace and it's named for Palatine Counts of the Holy Roman Empire, who held court in the nearby city of Heidelberg from the 13th to the 18th century.
  • Traces of winemaking from 550 BC.
  • The region languished for a while after Romans left, viticulture was not a priority for a long time.
  • German wine route created in 1935 and is an easy path for tourists, great for Pfalz wine (Deutsche Weinstrasse) -- has helped with revival in modern times

Today:

  • Pfalz is one of the most innovative regions in Germany – young winemakers, less expensive land

Grapes

  • 60% white, 40% red
    • Riesling 25%
    • Dornfelder 14%
    • Muller-Thurgau 10%
    • Blauer Portugieser 9%
    • Spatburgunder 7%
  • Mittelhaardt – top Rieslings, South – increasing plantings of Riesling but also Spatburgunder, Portugieser, Dornfelder
  • Different from many German regions –
    • Dry wines, not sweet
    • Fuller bodied
    • Reds – can reach 13% alcohol (rare in Germany)

Pfalz is the place dry wine lovers should try first in Germany! So go explore! 

Direct download: 173_Ep_173__Pfalz_Germany.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 12:09pm EDT

A poem...because Halloween is our favorite holiday!

 

An Ode To Halloween Candy Pairing…

 

Halloween was fun, now it’s day of the dead

So don’t make a mistake that will mess with your head

Although some have an empty bowl where once there were sweets

Most of us have tons of left over treats

 

Whether you’re stealing from your kids or eating from the work trough

We’re here to make sure your wine doesn’t taste off

 

Because although some wine people recommend Cab

Malbec, Pinot Noir, and Syrah in their gab

We’ll remind you once more as we did in a podcast

That you should reconsider before you reach for a glass

Dry wine is nasty with Halloween candy

Regardless of your palate, it just doesn’t taste dandy

Bitter and gross with a hollow taste,

With delicious candy, it’s such a waste

 

Better for you is wine that is sweet:

Port, Muscat, Late Harvest anything you really can’t beat

Ruby Port with Snickers? Late Harvest Zin with Kit Kat?

We’ve told you a hundred times, this pairing is where it’s at

Sweet Sherry or sweet Vin Santo is nice

For Starburst and Skittles don’t think twice

Although I’d save the Sauternes and Tokay

With the sweetness of the candy, you could give it a try!

 

We know that sweet wine may not be in your cellar

But a wine sweeter than the dessert transforms things like Cinderella

So grab a sweet wine, invite some friends by

Choose some of these pairings, just give it a try

 

‘Cause Halloween comes just once a year

And this volume of candy will soon disappear

Don’t mess it up with a crappy pairing

That will leave you drunk and have you swearing.

Trust us on this one, we’re not trying to be beat

For candy, Post-Halloween, you better go sweet!

 

 HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Direct download: Bonus__An_Ode_to_Halloween_Candy_Pairing.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 2:57pm EDT

There is a lot of buzz about organic and biodynamic farming but what is it? Why does it matter? Does it make sense? You judge after hearing this explanation of both practices. 

 

For the transcript and details, go to http://winefornormalpeople.com/blog

Direct download: 10_Audio_blog_10__Organic_and_Biodynamic_Wine.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 11:07pm EDT

Garnacha, or Grenache is known by many but appreciated on its own by few. This time I talk about the grape and where to get the best of it. For the transcript and more detail please go to winefornormalpeople.com/blog

Direct download: Audio_blog_9__Garnacha_Tinta_Red_Grenache.mp3
Category:wine -- posted at: 11:49am EDT

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